Three Cultural Values That are Suffocating Your Faith: Part 3, Security

Posted: February 4, 2014 in Uncategorized

I remember hearing a professional athlete some years ago make the case for renegotiating his contract. He was already making several million dollars a year and had a hefty signing bonus from his current contract already in the bank. There were a few years left on that contract but for a number of reasons he wanted a new contract and even more money. The case he made when people objected that he already had a great contract was this, “this is about my families security. This is about feeding my kids and getting them an education. It’s about my family’s security”. My first thought was, what planet are you living on. What kind of food do your kids eat when several million dollars a year doesn’t cover the grocery bill?

Of course it is easy to poke fun at an athlete who makes more in a year than many people will make in a lifetime yet is still worried about financial security and the future. When I speak of our cultural value of security it is the financial variety I am talking about. Make all the fun we want of the athlete but the fact is, nearly everyone in our western culture is looking for financial security. And nearly everyone is convinced that if they only had a little more money, security would finally be theirs. The athlete making millions a year worries about the end of his career and says, I just need a few million more a year and I will be okay. The business woman making great money on Wall Street says, if I only had a few hundred thousand more a year I would finally be secure. The middle class suburbanite says if I only had ten or fifteen thousand more a year I would be set. The inner city single mom says, if I only had a few hundred more a month I would be fine. Do you get the point? We all think that what we need is a little bit more and we would be financially secure and able to breathe easier.

Now I get the feelings of the single mom to whom a few hundred dollars a month means the difference between food on the table or shoes on the feet. But after that it seems to me that most of the rest of us have somehow missed an important biblical point. It goes to the story in Luke 12 of a farmer who had such a huge crop that he ended up building bigger barns to store all that grain in for a future day. He went to bed feeling completely secure in his future because by all human standards of measurement he had it made. No worries. His supply of food, i.e. tangible wealth in the 1st century, would never run out. He was as secure as anyone could ever be. Yet when he went to sleep that night, it was his last. The warning given by Jesus was do not seek to gain the whole world and then end up losing your soul. In our western material obsessed culture we are doing just that. Even within Christianity there is a growing movement that measures spirituality by how prosperous you are materially. Surely with such a theology we are in danger of losing our soul.

Perspective and context are often the keys to understanding life. In The United States there is an escalating tension over wealth. People who have huge amounts of it are being attacked for having it and people who don’t are crying out about the unfairness of it all. The 99% and occupy movements are indicative of this way of thinking. Here is my problem with it all. If you live in The United States you had best be careful about this whole 99% issue and about the injustice and unfairness of the income inequality you see. The reason is simply this, by mere fact of living in America you are among the tops 5% wealthiest people in the world. How do I figure that? Simple. For starters there are roughly 7 billion people on the planet of whom just over 300 million are living in the USA. That makes it less that 5 % of the world’s population. When we look at the financial side of it, when compared to the world’s top 30 developed nations, the average American makes about 60% more a year than the average for those countries. That doesn’t even take into account half the planet that lives on 2 dollars a day or less. That’s 3-4 billion people who live on two dollars a day. When you sift it all out what you end up with is that nearly every American is better of materially and financially than 90-95% of the rest of the world. So when you complain about the injustice of income gaps between the rich and the not so rich in America, remember that on a world context you are most likely among the rich.

I could go on with lots of numbers that would make your eyes glaze over. Rather, having been in 30+ countries on every continent but Antarctica in recent years I think I have a fairly decent view of the world and what people are living through. Let’s not talk numbers. Let’s talk lifestyle. Let me ask you a few questions. Have you gone out to dinner in the last month, including fast food drive through? Have you bought a book just to read for pleasure in the last 6 months? Have you gone to a movie theater in the last 12 months? How many televisions are in you house? Cable or satellite? How many cars in your family? Do you have things in your closet that you haven’t worn in a year because you have plenty of clothes that you do wear regularly? I could go on and on and on. Please understand this, for many people I know around the world the answer to every one of those questions is no or none. They could not dream of buying a book to read for pleasure because it is the cost of three meals. They have never been to a movie theater because it means the difference between a few hours of amusement and shoes. They have only the barest of necessities to sustain their lives.

What I find fascinating about so many of those folks is that they are more in touch with community, their faith, family, God, and lots of other things that really matter than any dozen of us who have so much more. You see something is happening to us in our material blessing. We are being deceived into thinking that those are the things that make life good. We have bought into the cultural value that says those are the things that will insure our security into the future. The problem is, we end up trusting in those things and not the Lord who blessed us with them. Jesus made it clear that we should not be obsessed with such things because our heavenly Father knows we need them and if we trust Him, He will take care of us. That was not a license to sit back and not work or even to plan for the future. Rather it was a word of assurance reminding us that our security does not come from our stuff but from our Father. Instead of feeling secure because we have material wealth we need to feel secure because of our relationship with and trust in our heavenly Father. Jesus says that all our stuff will rust, corrode, be burned up, stolen, destroyed. There is no security in that stuff. There is only security in Him. The more we place our security in the stuff, the less we will find true security in Him and that will slowly suffocate our faith.

Comments
  1. Cindy Mallin says:

    Excellent post, Pastor Dan. I’m passing it on…

  2. Tim Brown says:

    Once again Dan amazing way with words! Exactly what I have been thinking but not able to articulate!

  3. Kim Patterson says:

    Yes — many times when I encounter a financial challenge (new tires, unexpected home repair, etc.); I have to tell myself “That’s a rich man’s problem” (or woman). I know I’m blessed, even on a fixed income.

    My one comment is that Jesus is pretty consistent in warning us against greed. Thus, I just can’t understand why a chain (perhaps like Wendy’s with a good public image, not to mention best burgers) doesn’t charge 25 cents more per sandwich to:

    1) Pay workers $10 an hour; AND
    2) Create millions in additional profit while projecting the image of a philanthropic employer.

    Since something like 60+% agree with a working wage, how many people would start eating there?

  4. My favorite lines: Instead of feeling secure because we have material wealth we need to feel secure because of our relationship with and trust in our heavenly Father. Jesus says that all our stuff will rust, corrode, be burned up, stolen, destroyed. There is no security in that stuff. There is only security in Him.

  5. michelle says:

    Man, God is convicting me to go through my clothes! ;-). And though I have a hard time deciding I will never wear that again, I am not looking for more material things. When I have more, there is more to deal with and quite frankly begins to overwhelm me…a form of captivity. Jesus has come to set us free of all forms of captivity and that defiantly includes covetousness. Also why we don’t run out and buy a new car, a new car brings new expenses and we just don’t know if we’ll have the money tomorrow to keep up with it and debt is not something we believe is good for anyone.

  6. Cristal says:

    “What I find fascinating about so many of those folks is that they are more in touch with community, their faith, family, God, and lots of other things that really matter than any dozen of us who have so much more.” AMEN!

    I was just telling a friend that the believers in persecuted/closed countries have a blessing we’ll never understand. They have a “need” we will never have. They really get it. Their worship is authentic. Their devotion is genuine. Their love for Christ is at a depth for which I long.

  7. Bible Verses says:

    Great Post, Definitely makes you think about how much more important your relationship with God is.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s