The Pain Possibilities of Africa

Posted: July 21, 2012 in Christians and Culture, Christians Outside the USA
Tags: , , , , , ,

I am coming to the end of a week in Burundi in Eastern Africa. I don’t know how many times I have been to Africa in the last 6 years. It is probably approaching twenty. I do know that I have been to eleven different countries from Egypt to South Africa. Without fail I am struck by the extreme contrasts one finds in Africa. It doesn’t matter which country I visit, or what leaders or everyday folk I speak with, the story is the same. This is a continent of incredible beauty and massive ugliness, abundant resources and crippling poverty, gracious hospitality and violent division, widespread Christianity and rampant paganism, sacrificial generosity and selfish corruption beyond measure. It is not unusual in the least to one minute be in awe of the natural beauty of Africa and the next be heartbroken at the ugliness of civil war and genocide that often overtakes parts of Africa. I regularly meet people who are eager to serve a guest and give the best of what they have but also hear unending tales of politicians and other leaders who stuff their pockets to overflowing, siphoning off foreign aid meant for their people, only to put it in off shore bank accounts.

More than once I have been asked what the answer is to the problems of Africa. My answer is the same time and again. Everything depends on leadership, and for Africa to realize its true potential everything depends of leadership from the church. As I see it, only an African Church that has leaders who live the radical faith of a follower of Christ, can begin to point the way out of the current state of affairs. With corruption being at the heart of economic problems in Africa, there is a desperate need for leaders in the church to first live above that corruption themselves and then be in a position to model and call for a new way of doing business. But if pastors can be bought off by politicians then they lose their credibility and their power to bring about change. Pastors and other church leaders must become servant leaders, serving others as Jesus did, not living as the chief who expects others to serve him. That kind of servant leadership then gives them the standing to be able to call other leaders, business, academic, and political, to also be servants of the people.

On a more corporate level, pastors need to begin to work together and not care who gets credit, or benefit from the work. The division among pastors in Africa is epidemic. I suspect that some of it is left over from the days of colonial missionaries who did not always cooperate with one another. But there has been fifty years of independence in most of Africa and it is time for Africans to work together, along with the rest of the Body of Christ around the world, so that together we can do more. The need for schools, hospitals, businesses that provide jobs and job training are beyond what any one or a few churches can do. But if pastors begin to set aside their own ego and pride and fear, then maybe, just maybe, they will be able to provide leadership that results in a partnership and synergy that really does begin to tackle the problems of Africa on a large-scale.

I realize that I am writing this as a westerner, and a white American to be specific. As such there are some who will immediately discount what I have to say or even react against it. I can live with that, in the hope that there are some, both in the west and in Africa, who will read this first with eyes of faith and not eyes of culture and colonialism. What I would hope is that what any follower of Christ says will be taken on its merits by any other follower of Christ and not cast aside because of cultural or ethnic bias. You see, we followers of Christ need each other. We are brothers and sisters in Christ first, and then somewhere further down the list of importance we are American or Burundian or Egyptian, or Kenyan, or white or black or any of the other distinctions we use to separate one from another. We need to see those distinctions not as things that divide us, but as blessings that together make us more than we could ever be apart from one another. That is the lesson of 1st Corinthians 12. We are all different by the will of God and those differences should make us stronger and more dependent on one another, not weaker and divided from one another.

I look for the day when Christian leaders, not only in Africa, but from every continent will rise above division and self-promotion and instead live for the sake of others and work together for the Glory of God.

Comments
  1. adamlovepi says:

    My prayers are with you as you carry a burden for the good people of Africa.

  2. rpricevizn says:

    Continue “provocating” for His Kingdom Dan! You and your ministry are an inspiration to my wife and I. May you continue to be led, motivated, pushed, comforted and encouraged by the Holy Spirit.

  3. Wonderful post. I’ve traveled a lot to India and struggle with similar issues in India…a love/hate relationship. Well done post! Thanks for sharing your experiences and concerns.

  4. Cristal says:

    God has clearly given you a heart for people He loves. And even as Jonah was sent to warn the “bad guys”; so you can share Truth with the violent and selfish. God bless you and the endeavors He has planned for you, Dan.

  5. Judy says:

    Amen. Rising above division and self-promotion in Christian unity to serve and live to the glory of the Lord is the answer for the problems on every continent of the world.

  6. Beautiful! Once again I am proud to say I know you. Excellent post!

  7. Irene says:

    Hmm. Loaded and thought-provoking. The difference we will make if all of us Christians, and our leaders, will live the “radical faith of a follower of Christ” in every sphere of influence God has given us. What impact that will make across our nations and continent!

  8. Philip Miya says:

    How good and pleasant it is for breathren to dwell together….(Ps 133). It is high time for us leaders, hence pastor to realize the need of working together for the sake of Christ. We should lay aside a self serving type of leadership and serve Christ Jesus. Hevean is one, God is one. Amen.

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