You are Called by God to the Ministry

Posted: February 20, 2009 in Lay Ministry
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Last night I sat in a conference listening to Neil Cole talk about the damage we have done to the cause of Christ by making the ministry of the professional clergy more important than that of the average Christian. I could not agree more. If you are a follower of Christ, you have been called by God to be a minister in Christ’s name. The job of the “professional” is not to do what God has called you to do, but to give you every tool and training you need so that you can do what God has called you to.

This is stated as clearly and as boldly as possible by the Apostle Paul in Ephesians 4:11-12

11It was he who gave some to be apostles, some to be prophets, some to be evangelists, and some to be pastors and teachers, 12to prepare God’s people for works of service, so that the body of Christ may be built up

As a pastor my job according to Paul, is to equip people for the ministry they have been called to by God. It is that work, work of ordinary Christ followers, that will build up the Body of Christ. It is the work of ordinary Christians like you that will make the real difference in the Church and in the world. People in positions like me are just coaches. You are the real players who make things happen.

Throughout the Bible we get the picture of how vital you are to the work of ministry. In 1 Corinthians 12 Paul talks about the church as the Body of Christ. He makes it clear that each and every person in the Body has a crucial role to play. Each person has a ministry that has been given to them by God. Each person is equally important in the functioning of the Body and the ministry of Christ. The hand is no more important that the foot, which is no more important than the eye, which is no more important than the ear. You my friend are of vital importance to the Body of Christ and if you are not doing the ministry God has called you to, then the rest of us are functioning one handed, or lame in one leg, or blind in one eye, or deaf in one ear. No wonder the church struggles.

But there is another very important point that Neil made. Do not think that your ministry that God has called you to is some “church” thing. Far too many people think that what they do from 9-5, Monday through Friday is “secular’ and what they do with the church is “sacred”. NO! All of life is sacred. Colossians 2:17 is clear, in whatever you do in thought word and deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ. I wrote a post on this several weeks ago. https://provocativechristian.wordpress.com/2008/12/03/provocative-worship-pt-2-all-of-life-is-sacred/ The point is, whatever you do, is to be done as an act of worship. That makes all of life sacred. All of life is ministry. If you are called by God to be an accountant, or cook, or engineer, or flight attendant, you are to do that for Jesus and look for every chance to serve others in His name.

I know that for many people this is a new concept. I know this because I teach a university course on this at Belhaven College. My students are adults who are finishing their degree at night. They are by and large people who have been Christians for some time and go to good churches. But when we talk about their job being a calling from God and something sacred, the lights come on for the first time. They never heard this. They always saw their job as somehow being inferior to that of their pastor or some other professional church worker. Real ministry is what the pastor does. That is nonsense!

When I came to faith in Christ I had never been a member of a church. I had rarely attended a church. What I did have at that point was the example of ordinary people who led me to Jesus and a Bible that talked all about ordinary people who did radical things in service to Jesus. I had no expectation or model that said “real ministry is done by professionals”. So stupid me, I just started doing what I saw people do in the New Testament and what my friends had modeled for me. All of life became life in Jesus. Whatever we did became an act of worship. If we went white water rafting it was a chance to experience the joy of the Lord and fellowship in His creation. That was no less an act of worship than when we sat down with a guitar around a camp fire and sang songs and prayed. When we went to work and became salt and light in the marketplace, it was no less ministry than when we went to a local park and talked to pot smoking teenagers about Jesus. There was no divide between the sacred and the secular and between the professional pastor and the ordinary follower.

You are a minister in God’s church and what you do everywhere, everyday is to be sacred in the eyes of the Lord.

Comments
  1. Matt says:

    Amen. The church will wake up when the ministers start coaching and the people in the pews start realizing they’re being coached for their ‘9-5’ job every day!

  2. Nic says:

    I like your blog and you have a lot to offer. I did not want to leave this here, but I dont see any other way to contact you. I was hoping you could do an article about being a biblical man. There is alot of talk about husbands, but hardly any I can see for us single guys. Anyway keep up the good work, and I’ll be sure to live a sacred life.

  3. Dan Lacich says:

    Nic,
    Thanks for the suggestion. That is a great topic. I will really think about that one and see what I come up with
    Dan

  4. tonyquist says:

    This is something God has been laying on my heart. I’ve got many thoughts on this and I’m praying for clarity to put them down in a few blogs posts. As you have emphasized in your post – for the most part, many churches have a wrong structure of ministry according to Eph. 4. Great post…I’ll send you link information once I get my thoughts down and posted on my blog.

  5. Jan says:

    This is a great point that many don’t “see”, myself included until a few years ago. My question for you relates to small groups in churches. I am trying to reconcile this in my own mind and what I believe is a calling. Our church is so saturated with small groups it seems that if you are in another group or no group at all you are an outsider. The pastor who is inspired and powerful in his sermons appears to have the same mindset. Although he is friendly sometimes he also has a group of friends in the church that he gravitates too most of the time. I feel the whole body of the church suffers – especially when new people come to the church and are left out. What are your thoughts in this regard?

  6. nations says:

    Thank you for your post. I have been struggling as I am an ordained minister who is not feeling God shifting me from traditional ministry to ministering in the marketplace as an author and speaker. I thought I had disappointed God and this was some sort of demotion. I am beginning to see that this is other territory that God is providing to use me to glorify his name and is his good works. Thank you for being so bold and bless you as you continue to follow the Father.

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